Extract

#Extract Cryptofauna By Patrick Canning @canningwrites

Today on my blog, I have an extract for you all to enjoy, which was sent to me by the author. 🙂

41eovQVJlIL.jpgPublisher: Pennyhart Books
ISBN13: 9781980409557
Genre: Fantasy
Release date: 25 02 2018
Price*: Kindle £2.99 (GBP)/  Paperback £6.99 (GBP)
Kindle $3.92 (USD)/ Paperback $7.99 (USD)
Pages: ~ 289
You can get this book here:
Amazon UK

Description of the book: Working as a janitor at an insane asylum in rural Idaho has made Jim unsurprisingly suicidal. Before he can go through with the act, one of the more mysterious residents, Oz, equips him a dog and a bag of ash, and strands him in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Jim has been unwittingly inducted into the game known as Cryptofauna, in which players battle one another to influence events around the globe. In order to replace Oz, Jim must complete three bizarre tasks, assemble a Combo (a team to play the game with), and understand the value of a decent pair of socks. Through a whirlwind of newfound friendship, underwater lairs off the coast of Norway, Brazilian orgies, and shapeshifting animals obsessed with hard drugs and AM radio, Jim fights to discover meaning in life while stopping his Cryptofaunan Rival from ending all life on the planet and just being kind of a general dick.

Extract: Chapter 1 – St. Militrude’s

Jim grabbed a can of root beer for his suicide. He wasn’t particularly big on sassafras or licorice, but drink choices were limited. The tap water at St. Militrude’s Home for the Insane and Elderly was notorious for its eggy flavor. Mellow Yellow was tasty, but the potassium citrate was known to have undesirable drug interactions. Coke was the obvious front runner, except one of the residents had recently thrown every last can of it off the roof in protest of an earlier bed time.

The conciliatory can of root beer jostled with the rest of the supplies on Jim’s janitorial cart as he pushed it down St. Mili’s labyrinth of hallways, mercifully quiet during the small hours. A jacket was the next item on the grisly scavenger hunt, because nobody wanted to die cold.

Perhaps surprising to some, a bleak occupation in a bleak setting wasn’t the catalyst behind Jim’s decision to end his life. He wasn’t bitter or depressed; he wasn’t heartbroken or mad at the government. Jim had simply made the classic mistake of thinking about it all too much. He’d always been of the suspicion that if one gave it too much thought, it being the why of it all, those thoughts would inevitably lead to suicide, or at least an absence of reasons not to do it. He’d gone in search of meaning and come up short, and this was pro-level stuff he was contemplating. The defeated janitor would’ve done well to stick to simpler, less fatal issues like why the bee makes honey or why yellow traffic lights were curiously but definitely getting shorter.

Jim trudged into the depths of the coatroom, battling a standoffish daddy long legs for nearly a minute before emerging with his white winter parka. He laid the poofy-bag-of-marshmallows jacket atop the root beer, and pushed his cart to the last stop: the pharmacy.

Because of his plentiful experience with cleaning up other people’s messes and an affinity for his boss, Nurse Gail, Jim had elected to go by pill overdose. It was clean, quiet, and showed respect for the party that was to discover the body.

With an extensive roster of patients in desperate need of daily medication, St. Mili’s pharmacy was a Mecca of dozens of drugs that, when taken in excess, resulted in reliable death. Jim unlocked the mother of all medicine cabinets, perused its dizzying supply of amber bottles, and plucked the relatively obscure and verbally intimidating dikatharide olanzapine.

Conventionally used to combat the dreaded tag team of paranoia and psychosis, the drug didn’t cause nausea (again, he really wanted this to be an easy clean up) and with its high levels of liver-busting haloperidol, a successful overdose was all but guaranteed.

Jim parked the supply cart in front of his bedroom door, sandwiched between the king-of-ambient-noise boiler room and a storage closet that no one used because a) the door was jammed, and b) it smelled like a wet dog chewing black licorice.

Inside his bedroom at last, Jim locked the door and set the lamp on dim, considering. He sat cross-legged in the center bouquet of his flower-patterned rug, donned his marshmallow jacket, and opened his forced compromise can of root beer. The angry sound of freed carbonation joined a faint rendition of “O Canada” from a dementia-plagued geriatric on the floor above.

Making what he assumed would be his last choice, Jim decided to put liquid in before pills as opposed to the other way around (a traditionally benign but of course hotly-debated topic among the unpredictably opinionated residents of St. Mili’s). He sipped some root beer, and lifted the pills to their manufacturer-unapproved destiny.

It was at this moment, in a statistically improbable stroke of luck, that the knob of Jim’s locked door quivered.

C1ZJlgm6IyS._UX250_.jpgAbout the author: Patrick was born in Wisconsin, grew up in Illinois, and now lives in California with his dog, Hank.
Website – https://www.patrickcanningbooks.com/about/ / Twitter – @canningwrites

 

*-the price was taken from Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.com on the current date. The price might change at the time of your purchase. The links used in this post for book purchases are affiliates.

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